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in eastern libya but then she said that i didn't see any of the security requests which were multiple coming from the consulate. if you are clear eyed about dangers and threats from eastern libya, why weren't you asking the questions about do we need more security? she also said she was aware about the prior attacks on the consulate and attack on the british ambassador. of course the british left so why if you knew about that, why weren't you asking should we leave or should we further secure our consulate? so there were a number of issues that i was concerned about. in addition she said she was in continuous contact with the libyan government. they had a willingness to protect our people but not a capacity. if you knew there was no capacity, i saw that video from that night. i have to tell you, the libyans that we had charged, we outsourced our security to, they ran as soon as they saw those attackers come to the consulate gate. and so we knew they didn't have that capacity. i think as the person who is in charge, the accountability review board found that there were systemic failures of le
did not really zero in on the connection between the deteriorating threat environment in eastern libya and in benghazi. and a direct threat on our compound. so we have work to do. we have work to do inside the department. we have work to do with our partners and the d.o.d. and the intelligence community to constantly be taking in information, making sure it does get to the right people, that it isn't somehow stove piped or stalled. but that it does rise to decision makers. and i'm committed to improving every way that i can on what the arb told us to do on assessing our intelligence. and i think it's fair to say, congressman, that we have to do this now because i predict we're going to be as we saw in algeria seeing all kinds of asymmetric threats. not just to our government facilities but private sector facilities. in tunisia although we protected our embassy, our school was badly damaged. so we have to take a broader view. and i think that the arb gives us a start, but it's not the whole story. >> mr. grayson from florida. >> thank you, mr. chairman. and thank you very much, secretar
, not just eastern libya, across libya, there were a number of conversations and meetings to try to see what we could while libya went through the transition from transitional government to elections to get in there and help them with security. because it was clear that that was going to be one of their highest needs once they finally got stabilized. so, you know, there were a number of meetings and i personally -- i went to libya in october of 2011. i spoke with the then leadership. i met with them in international settings. we sent teams out both civilian and military experts to try to help them. until recently, while they were going through their transitions, it was a very difficult conversation because they didn't have the authority they thought. now we're beginning and we have a long list of ways we're trying to help improve security in libya. >> for example, the october 2011 meeting, at that meeting, did this issue come up with regards to the inability of the libyan government to protect our diplomatic institutions, did that issue come up at all? >> we obviously talked at great deal ab
environment in eastern libya and benghazi and a direct threat on our compound. we have work to do, to take in the information, making sure it gets to the right people and it isn't somehow stovepiped or stalled. that it does rise to decision-makers. i am committed to improving every way i can on what a.r.b. toll us to do on assessing our intelligence. i predict we will see all kind of threats not just to our government facilities but to private sector-facilities. in tunisia, although we protected our embassy, our school was badly damaged. we have to take a broader view. the a.r.b. gives us a start. it is not the whole story. >> thank you secretary clinton for yourto securing america's place in the world the past four years. and your contributions to world peace. the first question these do with accountability review board report that identifies specifically people who were found to have engaged in the department and systematic failures and deficiencies. i want to be clear. you were not one those people, is that correct? >> that is correct. it was said great a report in the 1990's the secret
environment in eastern libya. that was what we were trying to address with the libyans. and remember the election in july in libya brought to victory what we would consider moderate people who had a very different view of it than al qaeda or other groups. the united states has to be as effective partnering with jihaddists whether they fly a black flag or other flag. >> i clearly understand that. however this flag was pointed out to be affiliated with al qaeda, terrorists who attack and kill united states citizens from around the world. did anyone in your department below you, were they aware of this report and photos prior to and don't you think they should have brought this to your attention? >> i am well aware there were people claiming to be associated with al qaeda. that were attempting to influence militias, attempting to exercise more authority, along with a number of other groups that didn't necessarily work under that flag but had the same militant jihaddist mentality. i was certainly aware of that. so was chris stevens, so was our team in libya. >> my point is this flag kept
discussion about the deteriorating threat environment in eastern libya. we were very conscious of them. i was assured by our security professionals that repairs were under way. additional security upgrades had taken place. >> the do you see the cable -- did you see the cable asking for reinforcements for the security detail that would be evacuating in august? >> no, sir. >> okay. when you read the document, it strikes me as -- how certain the people were. when was the first time he spoke to or had ever spoken to the evacuees? >> i have spoken to one of them could i waited until after they had done their investigation because i did not want there to be anybody raising and the issues. -- raising any issues. >> how many were a factor when it from libya? >> the numbers are hard to pin down the approximately 25-30. >> did anybody in the state department talk to those people shortly afterwards? let there was discussion going on -- there was discussion going on afterwards. the fbi spoke to them before we spoke to them. other than our people in tripoli -- i think you're talking about washington,
to them. with regard to the situation in libya, not just eastern libya, across libya, there were a number of conversations and meetings to see what we could can do while libya went through this transition to try and help them with security. because it was clear that that was going to be one of their highest needs once they finally got stabilized. so there were a number of meetings and i personally went to libya in october of 2011. i spoke with the then leadership. i met with them in international settings. we took teams out, both civilian and military and tried to help them until recently while they were going through there's transitions, it was a very difficult conversation because they didn't have the authority we thought. >> for example, the october 2011 meeting, at that meeting, did this issue come up with regard to the inability of the libyan government to protect our diplomatic institutions? did that issue come up at all in that conversation? >> well, we obviously talked at great deal about the deteriorating threat environment in libya. one of the reasons we had our own people on th
, not just eastern libya, across libya, there were a number of conversations, and meetings to try to see what we could do while libya went through this transition from transitional government to interim government to election toss try to get in there and help them with security, because it was clear that that was going to be one of their highest needs once they finally got stabilized. so there were a number of meetings. and i personally, i went to libya in october of 2011. i spoke with the then leadership, i met with them in international settings. we sent teams out, both civilian and military experts to try to help them. until recently, while they were going through their transitions it was a very difficult conversation because they didn't have, you know, the authority they thought. but now we're beginning and we have a long list of ways that we're trying to help improve security in libya. >> for example the october 2011 meeting at that meeting did this issue come up with regards to the inability of the libyan government to protect our institutions. did that come up at all in that conversati
zero in on the connection between the deteriorating threat environment in eastern libya and in benghazi and a direct threat on our compound. we have work to do inside the department, we have work to do with our partners and the d.o.d. and intelligence community to constantly be taking in information, making sure it does get to the right people that it isn't somehow stovepiped or stalled but that it does rise to decisionmakers and i'm committed to improving every way that i can on what the a.r.b. told us to do on assessing our intelligence and i think that it's fair to say, congressman, that we have to do this now because i predict we're going to be, as we saw in algeria, all kinds of asymmetric, not just to government facilities but to private sector facilities. in tunisia, we protected our embassy but the school was badly damaged. we have to take a broader view but the a.r.b. recommends. >> thank you very much for your contribution securing america's place in the world the last four years and for your contribution to world peace. the report does identify specifically people who were fo
reconstituting themselves in eastern libya, trying to track down man pads that could get into the wrong hands, and, unfortunately, many have. so, you are constantly making a calculus, how you balance all of this off. and because there's no part of the world that is irrelevant to the united states anymore, when i came into office, did we worry about governments changing in north africa and the middle east? did we worry about a place called mali becoming a potential safe haven for terrorists? did we think we could get an opening in berma? i could go on and on. there are things you know you always have to deal with, the threat of nuclear weapons and their spread, the threat of extremism and its incredible dangers and on and on. those are the challenges, but then you have to also respond to the crises of the moment. do everything you can to manage them, and then you have to take a longer view at what are the trend lines, what is technology going to do to us, what is climate change going to do to us? what are we going to do to enhance the roles of women and girls, so it's a fascinating time to hav
environment in eastern libya and in benghazi and in a direct threat on our compound. we have work to do inside of the department and with our partners and of the dod and the intelligence community to constantly be taking that information and make sure it does get to the right people and it isn't somehow stovepipe or stalled but that it does rise to decision makers and i am committed to improving every way that i can with the arb told us to do on assessing our intelligence and i think it's fair to say, congressman, that we have to do this now because i predict that we are going to be as we saw in algeria seeing all kinds of asymmetric threats not just to the government is devotees that private sector facilities in to nisha although we protected our embassy and our school was badly damaged so we have to take a broad view and i think it is a start but it's not the whole story. >> mr. grayson from florida. 63 mr. chairman and secretary clinton for your contributions to securing america's place in the world for the past four years and for your contributions towards world peace. the first question i
output to prewar levels. and you have to look at the situation in libya. we know eastern libya has been having extreme security problems. look what happens to the u.s. consulate. look what happens to the italian consulate this week. as these groups start targeting the energy sector, that could be real trouble for the energy markets. >> what do you recommend from here? whether it's investors, some of the countries operating in this part of the world. what do they do now if this is not something to be viewed as a one off event? >> this is such a troubling situation for international oil companies. they hate to lose their workers. they put such a premium on the safety of their workforce and these companies preemptively will shut down operations if they view their workers at risk. so this is a very dangerous development and i'm not sure the market appreciates that. >> and lastly, as we turn to look at the impact on world markets, do you expect we'll start to see oil prices moving higher because of more of these supply constraints at a time when most people have been saying the opposite was
ongoing discussion about the deteriorating threat environment in eastern libya. we were very conscious of them. i was assured by our security professionals that repairs were under way. additional security upgrades had taken place. >> did you see the cable asking for reinforcements for the security detail that would be evacuating in august? >> no, sir. >> okay. when you read the document, it strikes me how certain the people were. when was the first time he spoke to or had ever spoken to the evacuees? >> i have spoken to one of them could i waited until after they had done their investigation because i did not want there to be anybody raising any issues. >> how many were a factor when it from libya? >> the numbers are hard to pin down the approximately 25-30. >> did anybody in the state department talk to those people shortly afterwards? there was discussion going on afterwards. the fbi spoke to them before we spoke to them. other than our people in tripoli -- i think you're talking about washington, right? >> the point i am making is a simple phone call would ascertained immediately th
militias out of bens and other parts in eastern libya. this was fairly significant, yet, however, because there's been no follow-up action, no legal action, no one has been brought to justice, these extremist militias have been able to move back into benghazi, move back into their bases. they're intimidating witnesses according to various reports. the head of the libyan investigation has been kidnapped, effectively missing for quite some time now from the city of benghazi and so these extremist militias have been able to exert power prior to the attack taking place. this most certainly creates an extremely dangerous precedent. there are links between all of these groups. >> the whole issue of weapons. some of the weapons have made it to algeria, mali, elsewhere. i want to ask you about something else, and that is of course many of us remember you made it into that consulate right after the attack, found part of the ambassador's diary. tell us about that and the impact of that. we heard senator mccain during the quizzing there of secretary clinton mention the moment that you got that diary
the deteriorating threat environment in eastern libya and in benghazi and a direct threat on our compound. so we have work to do. we have work to do inside the department. we have work to do in our partners and d.o.d. and intelligence community to constantly be taking in information, making sure it does get to the right people that it isn't somehow stove piped or stalled but that it does rise to decision makers and i'm committed to improving every way that i can every everything that the arb told us to do in assessing our intelligence, and i think it's fair to say, congressman, that we have to do this now, because i predict we're going to be, as we saw in algeria, seeing all kinds of aas i metric threats not just to our government facilities but to our private sector facilities. in tunisia we protected our ambassador but our school was badly damaged. so we have to take a broader view and i think the arb gives us a start but it's not the whole story. >> >> thank you very much for your contribution securing america's place in the world the last four years and for your contribution to world peace.
oil and gas reserve, preserve across eastern algeria and western libya. so where we are right now? with an unknown number, three to seven americans held hostage. we still don't know the, their state. lori: we haven't had a hostage crisis like this in a generation. >> no. but we had an attempted hostage situation of course. that is precisely what the intelligence community believes happened in benghazi with those four americans who were killed by terrorists there. interestingly, you know, he despite the fact that norway is, you mentioned statoil and norwegian oil company, bp, obviously british. despite all of that there has been little communication with the governments of the facility there and the interesting relationship here. we talked a lot about energy independence on your show, mine and all others here at fox business. but this is an example of what is happening when you are not, what can happen when you are not energy independent. europe right now is a classic case of dependency on foreign energy. a third of their gas, this is a gas plant in algeria, they're looking at 14%,
necessary and proper steps that are required to deal with the situation. it happened overnight in eastern algeria, on the border of libya. this is a joint venture. algeria is a huge producer of natural gas supplies some 30% of natural gas to europe and these militants have said the reason they have conduct this attack is because of retaliation for french military intervention into neighboring mali. that's why they've undertaken this situation. so it's getting more and more intense in north africa and certainly we have seen the war on terror move from what was typically before what we call the middle east and east and now northern africa. >> as you well know the united states has quietly been helping the french who were trying to quell the al qaeda linked rebellion in mali. is that a leading indicator, is that what panetta is saying there will be american footprints in this whole situation? >> reporter: that's unclear at this point. he's traveling in italy. those were brief comments to reporters. we'll find out in ensuing days what he means. >> thanks very much, michelle caruso-cabrera as
of the hostages, including the americans, in eastern nigeria, right near libya. they could easily move into libya if they wanted. tom, thank you. >>> a fiery helicopter crash stuns london. more details after this. my geico app...see?ually ...i just uh paid my bill. did you really? from the plane? yeah, i can manage my policy, get roadside assistance, pretty much access geico 24/7. sounds a little too good to be true sir. i'll believe that when pigs fly. ok, did she seriously just say that? geico. just click away with our free mobile app. to help protect your eye health as you age... would you take it? well, there is. [ male announcer ] it's called ocuvite. a vitamin totally dedicated to your eyes, from the eye care experts at bausch + lomb. as you age, eyes can lose vital nutrients. ocuvite helps replenish key eye nutrients. ocuvite has a unique formula not found in your multivitamin to help protect your eye health. now that's a pill worth taking. [ male announcer ] ocuvite. help protect your eye health. >>> you're looking at a live picture right now at the white house. you can see it in the back
are expected to persist through the weekend for the midwest and the eastern portion of the u.s. >>> secretary of state hillary clinton will testify today about the terrorist attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya, four months after the attack that killed u.s. ambassador chris stevens and three others. clinton was scheduled to appear last month but couldn't because of health problems. >>> the house is set to vote today to extend the nation's debt limit for three months. house republicans are giving up demands for deep spending cuts in exchange for approving an increase to how much the government can borrow. the move keeps the u.s. from defaulting on its debt for the first time in american history. if the approved, the bill would require both chambers of congress to pass a budget or the congress will not get paid. >>> there was a time when the 49ers made a habit of play-off runs to the super bowl but it's been a while. the last trip in 1995 almost two decades ago. cbs 5 reporter mike sugerman reminds us what it was like to be a 9er fa
. and that probably has much more to do with the situation in libya. egypt has been plugged into the middle eastern countries. from that point of view, there isn't much of a cross. clearly, if you're looking at egypt and two years on and you're looking at an immature political system that cannot gain stability and cannot unite around a single new national interest, clearly the longer that persists, then the worries about the longer term stability in the future. >> how vulnerable is egypt at this point? >> i don't know how close we are to an economic -- a major economic crisis. i think -- i do think a lot will depend on how successful and how quickly they can hold parliamentary elections. the latest rumors are that it will be held in april. that may go to some way of helping to set in stone the new transition process and that in itself may help engender some confidence and stability that parliament may be able to work with the president to bring some stability. but you're looking at an extremely divisive and polarized device at the moment. trying to concoct something out of that appears very difficu
, libya. authorities aren't sure who was behind the assault. the violence marks the latest on a series of attacks in the eastern libyan city. those include the september 1 1th attack on the u.s. consulate that killed ambassador christopher stevens. >>> to washington now and harmid karzai just wrapped up his visit there. a complete transition of combat operations in afghanistan by the end of 2014. some u.s. troops may stay beyond that date, but it would depend if they get immunity from prosecution. he discussed both issues when he sat down with kchristiane amanpour for the only interview of his trip. >> we talked about immunity if they negotiate a status of forces. are you ready to agree to immunity for u.s. forces? the president in his press conference with you made it very clear. no immunity, no u.s. troops. >> i can go to the afghan people and tell them that, well, if we are to ask a u.s. presence in afghanistan, for that broader security and stability, there are things that they want in return. and immunity is the principal thing that they want. i will argue for it. i can tell you w
. >> much appreciated. >> yes. >> love the shout out. see you tomorrow night 10:00 p.m. eastern, right here. >> ghouled morning to you. i am heather nauert. >> i am ainsley earhardt. >> we are going to start now with the 5@5:00. we now know weapons stolen from libya were part of the terrorist massive arsenal in the attack on the algerian gas plant. militants from 8 countries including canada carried out the siege. lovelady had only been in algeria for 10-days. >> he told us all of the time. we asked do you feel safe? do you feel safe? you don't have to go. he said nothing's happened there in so long. >> 7 other americans survived including a colorado man who hid for 2 and a half days. >> sometimes with the terrorists only a few feet away. >> terrifying moments for passengers on a southwest flight in denver, airport. a sensor light went off just as the plane was about to take off. the pilot slamming on the breaks blowing out three tires. >>> it was a little scary. we were just about to take off and then it slammed. it was a big jolt. >> when we were in the air starting to lift. no one habeca
, washington. >>> well there was a report this morning between the linch to the attack in libya and the seegs in algeria. algerian officials told "the new york times" that several egyptian militants who took part in the september attack in benghazi were also involved in the hostage crisis in eastern algeria. they say the militants were killed during the assault. the attack to the gas plant was connected to neighboring city mali. they said they attacked due to the crackdown on the algerian fighter jets there. elizabeth palmer has that part of the story very when we arrived at the main military airfield, wi found u.s. transport planes had already started to land. five in all, bringing in more than a hundred tons of gear and soldiers from a military base in france. the fighter planes, armored vehicles, helicopters, they're all french, and so are the soldiers. 2,800 french boots on the ground here in mali but behind the scenes this is an international effort and war very few saw coming. the u.s. air force role is critical. >> it's a great dynamic situation,
attention to algeria. >> sure, hostage situation is in eastern algeria, a largely lawless area, that sits next to libya itself is a lawless area. if you've got an area without much government control. this situation in algeria for the hostage takers is about mali, and mali borders algeria and the french stopped islamists moving to the capital and because of that these hostage takers in algeria-- >> hold on, you lost mere. >> sorry. >> megyn: who is mali, and why do we care about her? just kidding. mali is a country that used to be a democracy and then there was a coup and all sorts of bad guys started running mali. so-- >> pouring down from the north into the south and we're trying to push, the french are trying to push them back. >> megyn: so this is related to that issue. so people are upset in algeria what is happening in mali. how did the american citizens get involved in this. >> the american citizens are workers at this gas plant, the international oil and gas facility run largely by bp, which has had quite a bad streak of luck recently and seized by islamicists called themselves th
. it is in eastern algeria, 37 miles from the libyan border. that's important because they believe the people that carried this out came in from the east, in from libya. they went to this gas field, owned by bp. the algerians and the norwegians. they had a previous attack and it didn't work. they moved to another part of the complex. it is quite large. that's where they took the hostage. >> the man claiming responsibility is mokhtar belmokhtar. >> he has broken away from al qaeda. he broke away in december. he is an el salafism. he is very hostile to the west, particularly well-armed. over the last year, he has been buying libyan arms, surface air missiles, other heavy weaponry. he is a particularly dangerous radical guy. >> is he libyan or algerian? >> he is algerian. this he go back to 1992. the libyans -- the libyan revolution has opened arms they never had access to before. this has been brewing for some time. >> jill, i know defense secretary panetta has made a statement about it today. is it possible the u.s. might take military action? >> they might if they want to try to i have sa the
the islamists in mali. a government in libya still trying to get off its feet and further to the east with president morrisey and the problems and the country are egypt still not eastern how that works out. an entire region in northern africa over the past 24 months that has transformed before our eyes with an uncertain future for so many millions and involvement to some degree in many parts of northern africa. martha, back to you. >>> a man from texas is among the dead hostages in algeria. his family is now speaking out. they say that he had a loving heart, a caring nature and a good sense of humor. according to several reports he died of a heart attack during one of the raids at the gas plant. still, a lot of this is very unclear and at this point we don't know if he s the only american who died during this hostage standoff. back to washington, d.c. where are president obama is preparing to take the oath of office for a second term. it will happen in a small ceremony at the white house approximately two hours from now. carl cameron is live in washington, d.c. tell us why the officia
obviously this happened at a gas field. if you look at the map, it's in eastern algeria. that's 37 miles from the libyan border. and that's important because they believe that the people who carried this out came in from the east, in from libya. they went to this gas field. it's owned by bp. the algerians and the norwegians. and they carried out this attack. apparently what happened is they had a previous attack. it didn't work. and then moved to another part of this complex. you can see it's quite large. and that's where they took these hostages. they say that they have 41 people that may or may not be true. initially, the reports were there were seven americans. there are probably about three. but there are also japanese, british, norwegian and irish at least, anderson. >> and bob, the man claiming responsibility for this, his name is mokhtar belmokhtar. what do you know about him? >> he has broken away from al qaeda. he broke away in december, but has long-standing relations. he is a salahify. he is particularly well armed. over the last year he has been buying libyan arms, surface-to
address tonight. we'll have that live for you at 7:00 p.m. eastern here on c-span. tomorrow, secretary of state hillary clinton testifies on capitol hill on the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. first up, she's before the senate foreign relations committee. that's live at 9:00 a.m. eastern on c-span3. then, in the afternoon the secretary before the house foreign affairs committee. that's set to get under way at 2:00 p.m. eastern. again, both of those hearings live on c-span3. also, c-span.org tomorrow. also tomorrow, the house will postpone a decision, will debate a bill postponing on raising the nation's debt ceiling. you saw pete sessions, the rules committee chairman, filing that rule on the house floor a moment ago. they met this afternoon to discuss the flan which would require both chambers of commerce to pass a budget plan by april 15 or have their salaries withheld. the debt at $16.4 trillion. the meeting is an hour and 20 minutes. >> i want to welcome our -- three of our four witnesses that are here. it's always a fun thing to see a star of the show, everybody w
clinton testifies today about the september 11 attacks on the consulate in benghazi, libya that killed ambassador chris stevens and three other americans. secretary clinton appears before the senate foreign relations committee and we will have live coverage on cspan 3 and at 2:00 eastern, secretary clinton testifies before the house foreign affairs committee and you concede that live on c-span 3 as well. -- you can see that live on c- span 3 as well. >> cspan, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> coming up today on c-span, "washington journal"is live with your phone calls, e-mails, and tweets. the u.s. house returns for work on legislation to suspend the federal debt ceiling until mid- may. in 45 minutes, the freshman democrat from nevada, will discuss his first term priorities. that will include spending, that will include spending,
questions about the september 11 attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi libya. it resulted in the deaths of four americans, including the u.s. ambassador. at 9:00 a.m. eastern, she will testify at a senate foreign relations committee hearing. at 2:00 p.m., she will be at the house foreign affairs committee. we will have full coverage on c-span3 and c-span.org. >> villagers have always meant a lot of time fighting irregular warfare. those terms don't make a heck of a lot of sense. that is one of the big takeaways that i have been doing six years of reading and research for this book. the way we think about this is it's all messed up. we think that somehow, conventional warfare is the norm. it is how these conventional armies slug it out in the open. the reality is those have always been the exception. just think about the more modern world. what was the last mentioned were that we saw? this is a hard question to answer. in fact, it was the russian invasion of georgia in 2008, which didn't last very long. all of the world today, there are people who are dying in war, whether it is afghanis
the house >> tomorrow is the long-awaited hearing for the benghazi attack in libya. that is on c-span three. later, secretary clinton testifies. you can watch that at 2:00 p.m. eastern. outcomes back at noon eastern. a conversation from this morning's "washington journal." >> here is the place of the natural -- national prayer service. we will have coverage on c-span 3. that in our studio, we are anded by susan ferrechio richard stevenson. let us get started. where does the president stand politically? guest: we saw it yesterday in his second inaugural speech that this is a resident who feels unbound by politics. he does not face reelection. this is a guy who has decided to go out and argue a liberal agenda. that is the starting place for everything we will see for the rest of the year. guest: i agree. what was unique about his speech is it was much more of a rallying cry than you normally hear in a second term inaugural speech. that is because the president plans to use the public getting behind him to push the agenda that would otherwise be difficult if not impossible to move. some of the
the september 11 attack on big housing, libya that killed four americans. at 9 a.m., secretary clinton appears before the senate foreign relations committee, live coverage on c-span three. at two eastern, secretary clinton testifies before the house foreign affairs committee. you can see it live also on c- span three. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> the house will vote on a bill wednesday to extend the debt limit until mid-may, allowing the government to continue borrowing. the house rules committee met tuesday to discuss plans to pass a budget by april 15 or have their salaries withheld. this meeting is one hour, 20 minutes. >> this meeting will now come to order. i want to welcome our four witnesses that are here. it is always a fun thing to see a star of the show. welcome to the rules committee. we are delighted you're here today. i noticed the former chairman is here. we welcome the testimony. the head of the house of it ministration committee, i am delighted that you are here. as always, the rules
the politics. egypt is by far the largest middle eastern country, close to 90 million country, but also because the politics spill across borders. the muslim brotherhood has given birth to other movements in jordan, libya, syria, tunisia. it is seen as the ideological epicenter of the political pan-islamic movement. where the muslim brotherhood in egypt goes will have implications for these other political islamist organizations. if they can make that transition into pluralistic democratic organization can lead egypt forward, you will see other organizations follow suit and follow that model. >> it somehow seems from reading reports and listening to reports that morsi, president morsi, is becoming even more isolated from his constituency, from people in egypt, than he was obviously when he was elected. >> well, he's definitely in a difficult position because in egypt, the muslim brotherhood ironically has become a moderate organization. you have now the ultra-conservative group trying to push him to the right and they're much more extreme. and you have the secular liberals leftist that have bee
spotlight series continues with robert draper of national geographic on the history of libya and live under former dictator muammar gaddafi. "washington journal is live starting at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. president obama called on congress to pass a comprehensive immigration bill. speaking in las vegas, he complement the efforts of a bipartisan group of senators announced an immigration reform plan yesterday. >> thank you. >> thank you. [applause] >> thank you so much. thank you. well, it is good to be back in las vegas. [applause] and it is good to be among so many good friends. let me start off by thinking -- hanking everybody at del sol high school for hosting us. [applause] go dragons. let me especially thing your outstanding principal. [applause] there are all kinds of notable guests here but i just want to mention a few. first of all, our outstanding secretary of the department of homeland security, and janet napolitano. [applause] our wonderful secretary of the interior ken salazar. [applause] former secretary of labor, hilda solis. [applause] two of the outstanding members of t
. season one begins presidents' day at 9 p.m. eastern and pacific on c-span, c-span radio and c-span.org. [inaudible conversations] >> now, more from the world economic forum in davos, switzerland. the heads of government from egypt, libya, lebanon and the palestinian authority last week discussed the political and social challenges facing the region. this is just over an hour. mach knox. [inaudible conversations] >> ladies and gentlemen, ladies and gentlemen, welcome. i suppose one should say in traditional british style, one would have to say, my lords, ladies and gentlemen, because i see the prince in the front row. it's a great pleasure to have you all here. .. we need the cameras to stop once we start, please. we will have the conversation and then we will take a few questions from the floor. i want to warn you in advance since this is being taped, i ask you please to remember that you are asking a question which means it should be brief and it should be an actual question. if like to make a statement or speech there are many other opportunities at the world economic forum.
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